using bitdefender passwordmanager , should I remove google passwordmanager?

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using bitdefender passwordmanager , should I remove google passwordmanager?

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  • Flexx
    Flexx DEFENDER OF THE YEAR 2023 / DEFENDER OF THE MONTH ✭✭✭✭✭ mod
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    Life happens, Coffee helps!

    Show your Attitude, when you reach that Altitude!

    Bitdefender Ultimate Security Plus (user)

  • [Deleted User]
    [Deleted User] ✭✭✭✭✭
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    @ceasarsplace ,

    It is entirely up to you whether to remove the Google password manager. I use both the BD password manager and another paid product. There are no conflicts. BD Password Manager is evolving and more features are in the works to make it more competitive and easy to use.

    At some point in the future, I will probably abandon the other paid product when BD Password Manager is able to duplicate all of its functionality.

    So, it is YOUR computer and YOUR choice. Have a great day.

    Regards,

    Phil

  • What I ment to ask was; are my passwords safe in Googlle Passwordmanager.

    Thanks for your reply.

    Greeting G.J.

  • Flexx
    Flexx DEFENDER OF THE YEAR 2023 / DEFENDER OF THE MONTH ✭✭✭✭✭ mod
    edited March 11
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    No password manager is 100% secure, as there are always potential security risks involved when handling sensitive information like passwords. However, reputable password managers employ robust security measures to minimize these risks as much as possible. Here are some factors to consider regarding the security of password managers:

    1. Encryption: Reliable password managers use strong end-to-end encryption to protect your passwords and other sensitive data. This encryption ensures that even if the password manager's servers are breached, your data remains secure and unreadable.
    2. Zero-knowledge architecture: Some password managers use a zero-knowledge architecture, which means that the encryption keys are stored locally on your devices, and the company itself cannot access or decrypt your data.
    3. Multi-factor authentication: Password managers typically offer multi-factor authentication (MFA) options, such as biometrics (e.g., fingerprint or facial recognition), one-time passwords, or hardware security keys. MFA adds an extra layer of security to protect your account from unauthorized access.
    4. Secure communication: Password managers use secure communication protocols (e.g., HTTPS, SSL/TLS) to encrypt data transmissions between your devices and their servers, preventing eavesdropping or man-in-the-middle attacks.
    5. Regular security audits: Reputable password managers undergo regular third-party security audits to identify and address potential vulnerabilities in their systems and practices.
    6. Password management practices: While password managers are generally more secure than storing passwords in browsers or documents, their security can be compromised if users choose weak master passwords, reuse passwords across accounts, or fail to follow best practices for password management.

    While no system is entirely immune to security risks, using a reputable password manager with strong encryption, zero-knowledge architecture, and proper password management practices can significantly enhance the security of your online accounts compared to alternative methods like storing passwords in plain text or reusing the same password across multiple accounts.


    Google Password Manager is a built-in password management tool available in Google Chrome and Android devices. While it provides some convenience, security experts generally recommend using a dedicated third-party password manager instead of relying solely on Google's solution. Here are some considerations regarding the security of Google Password Manager:

    1. Encryption: Google Password Manager uses encryption to protect your passwords, but the encryption keys are managed by Google, which means Google can potentially access your passwords if required by legal authorities or in the event of a data breach.
    2. No zero-knowledge architecture: Unlike some dedicated password managers, Google Password Manager does not have a zero-knowledge architecture, meaning your passwords are not end-to-end encrypted, and Google has access to the encryption keys.
    3. Limited multi-factor authentication options: Google Password Manager supports multi-factor authentication (MFA) via Google's own systems, but it lacks support for some advanced MFA methods like hardware security keys or biometrics.
    4. Limited cross-platform support: Google Password Manager is primarily designed for use within the Google ecosystem (Chrome, Android), making it less convenient for users who need to access passwords across different platforms or browsers.
    5. Potential privacy concerns: Since Google is an advertising company, some users may have privacy concerns about entrusting their sensitive password data to Google, which has access to a significant amount of personal information.

    While Google Password Manager can be a convenient option for casual users or those deeply embedded in the Google ecosystem, it may not provide the same level of security and privacy as dedicated third-party password managers like 1Password, LastPass, Bitwarden, or KeePass. These dedicated solutions often offer stronger encryption, zero-knowledge architectures, more robust multi-factor authentication options, and better cross-platform support.


    Concluding, it is totally up to you what you feel like is best for you. Personally, I use Bitdefender Password Manager on my laptop, and Lastpass on my desktop.

    Regards

    Life happens, Coffee helps!

    Show your Attitude, when you reach that Altitude!

    Bitdefender Ultimate Security Plus (user)

  • Thank you

    Greetings G.J.